YOU DO NOT KNOW WHAT THEY DID

 SLIDESHOW PANDA • BRYAN REGAN

SLIDESHOW PANDA • BRYAN REGAN

For her, eating bamboo with her dirty feet was life’s greatest treat.

You Do Not Know What They Did marks the triumphant return of Bangladesh's most controversial and enigmatic poet, serial self-emasculator and aspiring veterinarian Narting Tadoo, after nearly a year of inactivity. The seventh prose poem in Tadoo's scheduled 133-poem cycle deals with the difficult issues of species non-specific identification, prison society and a father's love for his bear-daughter.

YOU DO NOT KNOW WHAT THEY DID

Narting Tadoo

These two men standing across from each other, you do not know what they did. Around them the chaos of a prison riot. There is a general ruckus in Cellblock 7A. A man has just drowned in a toilet bowl, his face blue from inhaling too much toilet cake he did not even want. He has the face of a dog. A pig dog. (He is a pig dog, but you do not know what he did.)

The first man steps forward.

The first man says to the second man, the prison man, “Why did you do it? I must only know.”

The second man, the prison man, says, “I did not do it.”

First man: “She was my only daughter.”

Second man: “You do not know what I did.”

First man is crying like a boy baby.

Second man says: “You should know this. She was wearing her panda suit when it happened.”

First man is blinking his eyes in wonderment: “You saw it?”

Second man, smiling truthfully man to man: “I loved her.”

First man: “She was most at home in her panda suit.”

Second man: “For her, eating bamboo with her dirty feet was life’s greatest treat.”

First man, laughing now, wiping tears: “My panda girl.”

Second man: “May I abuse you now?”

Around them the prison riot spills out from Cellblock 7A. The guards run in all directions fighting off angry prisoners with fire pokers and difficult-to-use devices found in the Prison Warden’s Great Room.

Second man, prison man, unlocks door, and takes first man, daughter man, in a loving panda embrace.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Narting Tadoo grew up in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He was most inspired by the rebellious lyrics of Muzaffar Fazlul Chowdhury*, “the Poet of Deep Energies”. Tadoo now lives in Virginia in the USA and is pursuing a degree in the Veterinarian Sciences. Migration, part 4 of a 133-piece Epic Cycle all involving themes of Public Emasculation and Alcoholic Deliriums, was his first publication in English.

*Now in jail in Taungoo, Myanmar. Please support his immediate release!

Max Sheridan

Nicosia, Cyprus

I’m the author of Dillo (Shotgun Honey 2017), a pulp road novel, and the director of Write CY, a Nicosia-based platform for creative writing and community storytelling. I also co-direct Storyline Creatives, a boutique writing agency with a focus on storytelling.